Root Canal Therapy

 

Root Canal Therapy

When tooth decay or infection spreads far enough, the bacteria can enter into the nerve of the tooth. If this happens, the cavity can’t simply be filled and to cap over the nerve tissue. This leaves residual bacteria in the nerve of the tooth, which can travel to the end of the root and abscess through the gum tissue.

Root canal therapy removes the infected nerve canal and places a filling material within the root of the tooth. This prevents further infection spreading in the tooth or to other teeth. Failing to treat decay that has reached as far as the nerve can result in extreme pain and tooth loss. Antibiotic therapy helps to clear up any infection prior to treatment, but does not correct or prevent future problems.

While root canals have a bad reputation for causing pain, they really aren’t all as bad as they seem. Patients are made to be as comfortable as possible using anesthetic and analgesic techniques. The reputation of root canal therapy usually comes from the length that is required for the procedure, and having to keep one’s mouth open for an extended amount of time. Fortunately there are methods we can take to reduce this strain, such as using small mouth props and taking breaks to allow the jaw to rest.

After a tooth has had a root canal it is necessary to place a crown on the tooth. This helps maintain the structural integrity of the tooth so that it can be used for normal chewing, tearing and grinding of food.